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Nutrition

There is no denying what large scale epidemiological studies show.  We know now how to minimize our risk of chronic degenerative disease and lead health vibrant lives as we age. 

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Conditioning

To educate yourself further on the recent research findings when it comes to exercise and aging, the two articles below are must reads!

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Sleep

Chronic Sleep issues are the underlying cause of many stress induced conditions, including fibromyalgia.  Read the articles below to understand more about the importance of sleep.  If you have chronic sleep issues consider coming in for help in returning to deep restorative sleep.

Latest research findings published December 28, 2013 in ScienceNews.org

Sleep showers away cellular grime that builds up while the brain is awake — just the sort of process that could have made sleep a biological imperative, scientists reported in October (SN: 11/16/13, p. 7).

People have long puzzled over the evolutionary pressures that led animals to need sleep even though it leaves them vulnerable to predators and other dangers. Rinsing off the brain and disposing of waste proteins and other gunk might help explain why sleep evolved.

Many other things that sleep does, such as strengthening memories, are important. But they are probably bonuses to the real reason that slumber is necessary, says Suzana Herculano-Houzel of the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro.

Researchers led by Maiken Nedergaard of the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York stumbled upon sleep’s cleansing function while studying how the brain disposes of waste products.

The brain pushes fluid in between its cells to flush out buildup products, such as protein pieces that form plaques in people with Alzheimer’s disease, the team had found. After training mice to sit quietly on a microscope stage, the researchers could measure the fluid flow while the rodents were awake and asleep. Space between cells increased by at least 60 percent when the animals fell asleep, allowing cerebrospinal fluid to gush in and hose away buildup. When the animals woke up, some brain cells — probably ones called astrocytes — swelled up, narrowing the crevices separating the cells.

With the drainage system clogged, waste from hardworking nerve cells begins to pile up. Sleep deprivation or damage to the irrigation system may make it impossible for sleep to fully wash away the by-products, eventually contributing to neurodegenerative dis-orders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases, the researchers speculate.


Chronic Sleep issues are the underlying cause of many stress induced conditions, including fibromyalgia.  Read the articles below to understand more about the importance of sleep.  If you have chronic sleep issues consider coming in for help in returning to deep restorative sleep.

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Mind/Body Connection

100 Years of Mind-Body Research

Over 50 percent of deaths in the United States can be attributed to behavioral and social factors, says psychologist Oakley Ray, Ph.D., of the Departments of Psychology and Psychiatry at Vanderbilt University who reviewed the last century of research on psychosocial factors and health. Furthermore, recent research provides evidence that stresses that affect the brain can hurt the body at the cellular and molecular level and diminish a person’s health and quality of life. But, the research also says that maintaining a positive frame of mind can help a person overcome some of these stress effects, fight disease better and ultimately delay death. These findings are reported on in this month’s American Psychologist, published by the American Psychological Association (APA).

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Stress Threshold

Our Constitutional Nature

Hans Selye (the father of stress studies) once wrote of the rabbit and the turtle. Some of us approach life more like a rabbit, running from place to place, nibbling when we can, shooting off in all directions. Others approach life more like a turtle, proceeding methodically from point to point with careful attention to detail, taking things one at a time. Both extremes are healthy. What is unhealthy, or stressful, is trying to be different from our nature. For example, the rabbit says to her or his turtle spouse, "You never want to go anywhere or do anything." The turtle, feeling guilty, decides to become a rabbit for the night and go barhopping with the rabbit spouse. That, Selye says, is what causes stress- being untrue to our nature.

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